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Macaulay, Thomas

1800-59




Baron Thomas Babington Macaulay was educated at Cambridge.

He became a famous historian and essayist and became one of the greatest historians ever. His 'History of England' is considered a classic.

He was also a member of Parliament in 1830 and also of the Supreme Court of India (1834-38).

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Maugham, Somerset

1874-1965



Novelist and playwright, born in Paris. After studying medicine at Canterbury he worked as a surgeon at St Thomas's Hospital, London, England.

After 1897 Maugham turned to writing full-time. He is best known for his short stories, particularly 'Rain'.

Maugham travelled to Tahiti on which is based his novel 'The Moon and Sixpence'. Later on he returned to the Far East which resulted in many short stories, plays and novels such as 'East of Suez', 'Our Betters' and 'The Letter' 'Travels in India'
His novels include the semi-autobiographical 'Of Human Bondage'.

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Mickiewicz, Adam

1798-1855




Born near Novogrodek, Lithuania, Mickiewicz was Poland's greatest poet and lifelong apostle of Polish national freedom. Deported to Russia in 1824 where he met Pushkin.

In 1829 he left Russia and travelled in Germany, France, and Italy, eventually settling in Paris where he wrote 'Books of the Polish Nation and its Pilgrimage' and his great poetic epic 'Pan Tadeusz'.
He taught at Lausanne and Paris, and in 1848 he went to Rome to persuade the new pope to to support the cause Polish national freedom.

During the Italian revolution he organized the Polish legion, then returned to Paris where he edited the 'Peoples Tribune'.

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Orwell, George

1903-1950



Novelist and essayist, born in Bengal, India. Orwell's parents were members of the Indian Civil Service, and, after an education at Eton College in England, Orwell joined the Indian Imperial Police in Burma. This experience found expression in the novel 'Burmese Days'.

During the second World War he was war correspondent for the BBC and the Observer.

Orwell's two best-known books reflect his lifelong distrust of auto-cratic government, whether of the left or right: 'Animal Farm', a modern beast-fable attacking Stalinism; and 'Nineteen Eighty-Four' (1949), a novel setting forth his fears of an intrusively bureaucratized state of the future.

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Biography