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IQBAL, Muhammad

1876-1938




Indian poet and philosopher. Born in Sialkot (now Pakistan), he went to Europe to study philosophy and law. In the process he became a Pan-Islamic poet. He became famous after his return with the publication of a long Persian poem 'Asrar-e khudi' (The Secrets of the Self).

Muhammad Iqbal continued to write in Persian and later in Urdu.
In 1930 he proposed that the Moslems of Nortwest India be granted a separate state.

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Lu Hsu

1881-1936



Major figure in Chinese literature, born in Shao-hsing, Chekiang Province.

Published in 1918 his famous short story 'A Madman's Diary' - a Western style story modelled after Gogol which was critical of Confucian culture. His next story 'The True Story of Ah Q' is a repudiation of China's old order, while 'Na-han' (Call to Arms) established his reputation as the leading Chinese writer.

Forced by political circumstances to flee Peking in 1926, Lu Hsu found sanctuary in Shanghai's Inter-national settlement.

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Tagore, Rabindranath

1861-1941



Bengali poet and mystic, born in Calcutta, India. He is best known for his poetic works, such as 'Gitanjali' (Song Offering), and his short stories, like 'Galpaguccha' (A Bunch of Stories).

Tagore was a prolific writer and lectured in Europe, the Americas, and Asia. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913 and was most influential in introducing Indian culture to the West.

He founded near Bolpur the Santiniketan, a communal school to blend Eastern and Western philosophical and educational systems. He also was a gifted composer and one of India's foremost painters.

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